#1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0

    New To Coding(Very New)


    Hey, my name is william, 16 years of age, and i want to start learning to write codes and programs. I got several books for christmas over coding and game programing but i dont fully understand everything in there. Is their anyone that can teach me coding or can send me to a website that can give me a thorough tutortial on coding and programming. Thanks everyone on all and any feed-back you can provide. :)
  2. #2
  3. Contributing User

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,109
    Rep Power
    1802
    The first thing ye must know lest anyone point and laugh is that it is "code" not "codes". Code referes to a quantity, like sugar or sand. You don't refer to a pile of sands, its is just sand.

    Where to start depends on where you are at and what is your eventual aim.

    Answer the following and you might get a better and more appropriate answer.

    • What language do you intend to learn (first at least)? If you don't know, explain what you might want to achieve; you might then get appropriate advice.
    • Do you already have the necessary development tools (compiler, IDE, debugger etc)?
    • Do you already have a computer to develop on?
    • What OS are you developing on or for? Linux, Windows, OSX, iOS, Android etc.
    • What books have you got already? - That will allow us to give advice that might not render then useless.
  4. #3
  5. Contributing User
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    7,145
    Rep Power
    2222
    Ditto on what clifford said. In learning your first programming language (I'm assuming C or C++, since you posted here), you would do better with an in-person mentor/tutor. Or by taking a class, but given your age I don't know whether you would be allowed to attend a community college (I simply don't know their rules), plus a lot of those schools are hurting from reduced funding so many classes have been cut.

    We work best answering specific questions rather then explaining everything about programming. When you've started learning and encounter problems, then we can really help you. One problem is that there's specific terminology that all programmers use and which you will learn as you progress. Until you've learned that terminology, many of our simple and direct explanations could just go right past you. It's the same in any technical field.

    Since you mention game programming, you might want to check out GameDev.net (http://www.gamedev.net/page/index.html). I've never gotten involved there, but they're well established (been around for years), they have discussion forums, and they have a library of tutorials. Most of us here are students and professionals and professionals tend to not think highly of game programming. Myself, I think that it's a good learning tool since it can motivate a student to stick with it despite all the frustrating problems that we have all encountered when learning to program and even after we've learned. Also, in game programming you end up working with almost all aspects of programming, so you should come out of the experience with a wide range of programming skills.

    Learn. Don't let yourself get frustrated. And answer clifford's questions so that we can know how better to help.
  6. #4
  7. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0
    Thank you two for replying quickly, and sorry for not nothing the difference between codes and code :-/ I'm hoping to learn C++, I'm working off of my windows laptop, so that's what in goin to work with, windows. I've downloaded Microsoft Visual 2012 which is an IDE I do believe. I won't be able to list the books I've gotten until I get home later tonight. I will try to find someone near me that can tutor me, and ill have to look into community colleges, thanks dwise1. Ill be able to prove more information later. Thank you both
  8. #5
  9. No Profile Picture
    Registered User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    0
    Omg... I'm sorry for all those spelling mistakes.. And misused words, I'm on my phone.. :(
  10. #6
  11. Contributing User

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,109
    Rep Power
    1802
    Great - Visual C++ 2010 is a complete package, IDE, Compiler, Debugger, Source browser and more. It's a good place to start on Windows. However if you use the project wizards it does tend to generate a good deal of code for you, often using compiler specific extensions and and features - this will tend to confuse the issue if you are learning from a generic text.

    If you have not done so already, start here (this is you Visual Studio 2010, the steps may differ slightly in 2012):
    1. File->New->Project
    2. Selected the Visual C++->Win32->Win32 Console Application project type.
    3. Enter a name for the project; "first" for example.
    4. Click OK
    5. Step through the wizard with the next button, on the Application Settings page, check the "Empty project"
    6. Click "Finish"
    7. In the "Solution Explorer" pane, right-click the project name (in bold), and select Add->New Item.
    8. Select "C++ File(.cpp)", and enter a name; "first" or "main" for example.
    9. Now you have a place where you can start entering code; try something from your book; most have a simple "hello, world" test program. This may seem trivial, but think of it as just a test of the tools and your ability to use them.
    10. When you have entered the code, click the "Start Debugging" button (green triangle) or press F5.
    11. Your code will compile, and if it compiles successfully, it will run.
    12. The chances are (depending on what the code does) that it will run to completion and terminate so fast you will never see the output.. Click the "gutter strip" (a narrow light coloured strip running down the left side of the code editor window) on the left side of the editor window at the closing brace of the code - this will set a breakpoint in the debugger (you should see a red dot appear); run again, and the debugger will stop the program before closing it so you can see what was output. The debugger allows you to to much else such as step the code one line at a time, and viewing variables and memory. Learn to use it early in your efforts; it will save you hours. Click "confinue" (F5) or "Stop Debugging" to exit your code and return to the editor mode.
    13. Alternatively you can press Ctrl+F5 to run your code without the debugger. When you do this in the IDE, Visual Studio helpfully maintains the console window open for you until you explicitly close it, so you will be able to see the output that way too. However for any substantial code in development, running without the debugger is somewhat optimistic! When learning, it is good to place the breakpoint on the first line in main() and step through the code one line at a time so that you can see the code flow and variable state - it will all be much clearer to you that way.

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo