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    My instructor told me not to use Dev C++. WTF?


    I use Dev C++ because its free and, well, its not a Microsoft product. She says it does some things different, but I also don't want an autopilot program like Visual Studio to do everything for me.

    Why is she saying this? And what program should I use? I'd prefer to stick with a program where I do the work in order so I can learn everything, rather than the program doing things for me.
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    The bloodshed dev-c++ is woefully out of date. The last OS it was verified on was windows 2000.

    Try Orwell dev-c++ instead.
    It's a maintained and updated fork of the original, so it's got things like an updated compiler, better IDE (with less bugs, and more likely to be fixed bugs) and better support for newer OS's.
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    Originally Posted by salem
    The bloodshed dev-c++ is woefully out of date. The last OS it was verified on was windows 2000.

    Try Orwell dev-c++ instead.
    It's a maintained and updated fork of the original, so it's got things like an updated compiler, better IDE (with less bugs, and more likely to be fixed bugs) and better support for newer OS's.
    Thanks for this. I didn't know that existed. Is Orwell "better" than Visual Studio?
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    Originally Posted by pditty8811
    Thanks for this. I didn't know that existed. Is Orwell "better" than Visual Studio?
    "better" is a subjective point of view.
    If you're a professional corporate s/w developer writing code for windows, then one of the professional level visual studio packages is pretty much the only game in town.

    But for the student programmer, and even professional solo developers (or those in small teams), then there are a number of $0 choices available.

    The debugger that comes with visual studio (or the separately downloadable windbg) is excellent.

    If you're intent on s/w development as a career, then at least sampling as many different environments as possible is worthwhile. Change is constant, so you need to learn flexibility and adaptability.
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    Originally Posted by salem
    "better" is a subjective point of view.
    If you're a professional corporate s/w developer writing code for windows, then one of the professional level visual studio packages is pretty much the only game in town.

    But for the student programmer, and even professional solo developers (or those in small teams), then there are a number of $0 choices available.

    The debugger that comes with visual studio (or the separately downloadable windbg) is excellent.

    If you're intent on s/w development as a career, then at least sampling as many different environments as possible is worthwhile. Change is constant, so you need to learn flexibility and adaptability.
    Thanks for this. I plan on becoming a professional programmer in C++.
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    You (or rather your tutor) perhaps need to be clear that Dev-C++ is not a compiler. It is and IDE. It uses MinGW/GCC. While GCC is a competent and highly standard's compliant compiler, the version generally shipped with Dev-C++ is very old (last updated in 2005) when Bloodshed Dev-C++ development ceased. I suspect your tutor's concern is with the version of MinGW/GCC rather than Dev-C++ itself (even if she is not aware of that or has not articulated it precisely)

    This is not true of Orwell Dev-C++ which has an up-to-date release of MinGW/GCC. One problem with Dev-C++ maintenance was always that it was written in Delphi rather than C++, which meant that most of those interesting in using it were not necessarily interested in or supporting its maintenance, or even able to. It is unusual for an open source project to be implemented in a commercial and non-free development tool/language. So even the Orwell fork may eventually fizzle out - it is the second such attempt to fork and maintain Dev-C++ that I am aware of; the other being wxDev-C++ which adds "visual" development using wxWidgets.

    The biggest problem with Dev-C++ was always it's debugger (or rather GDB integration). It was primitive, buggy and practically unusable. I do not know whether Orwell has improved this since.

    Code::Blocks is another excellent IDE that uses MinGW/GCC and its debugger certainly does work. It also has add-ins for wxWidgets GUI development, and is supported cross-platform - even usable of a Raspberry Pi computer.

    Your opinion of Microsoft Visual Studio is I would say unfair and prejudiced. It has about the best debugger available, and that in its own is a good enough reason to use it IMO. While Visuals Studio has a good deal of productivity features and code generation wizards that can get you started rapidly while to some extent "locking you in", nothing in Visual Studio forces you to use to use any of that. You can simply opt to create an "Empty Project" and simply create and add files to your project using standard C or C++ code.

    Visual Studio, even the free "Express" edition is a huge install, and Visual Studio 2010 is slow to start-up which can be frustrating for small projects. Visual C++ 2008 Express on the other hand is pretty quick. VS 2012 I have not tried - I am still trying to figure out the difference between the several different "Express" editions!

    All that said, regardless of your opinion of the recommended tool, it would be foolish to submit assignments that were not compiled and tested using the same tools that the person assessing the work (and awarding the marks) will be using. If the course-ware selection is truly insane (such as the 23 year old Turbo C compiler still required by many backward institutions, and for that matter the obsolete Bloodshed version of Dev-C++), then you should raise that with your tutor, but if your tutor needs to compile and run your submissions, just do as your are directed if you want to avoid dropping marks due to minor differences between tool-chains. If you want to get the marks, you should not be setting your tutor challenges trying to build your code.

    In the end you have to accept that since you thought that Dev-C++ was a good choice, and unaware of its many issues and obsolescence, then you are probably not in a position to disagree with your tutor's advice.

    Comments on this post

    • jwdonahue agrees : Well said.
    Last edited by clifford; May 5th, 2013 at 04:40 AM.
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    One more plus about Visual Studio is that the compiler is actually very good and produces some of the fastest code around (second only to Intel's compiler according to benchmarks I saw a few years ago). And it has a pretty good built in debugger and IDE integration.
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    Has the wxDev-C++ fork been discontinued as well? It appears the last update was October 2011, but then again, their previous updates take rather long intervals.

    For now, the Orwell project is in active development. I just emailed a bug report to the developer to which I got a response within the day. I hope the project does not get dropped.
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    Originally Posted by kathyrollo
    Has the wxDev-C++ fork been discontinued as well? It appears the last update was October 2011, but then again, their previous updates take rather long intervals.
    I think it probably has, but Code::Blocks has a wxWidgets add-in that also provides visual development.

    Originally Posted by kathyrollo
    For now, the Orwell project is in active development. I just emailed a bug report to the developer to which I got a response within the day. I hope the project does not get dropped.
    I think Orwell deserves support, unfortunately I voted with my feet as a Dev-C++ user long before the project started, when Microsoft released Visual C++ 2005 Express, which rendered Dev-C++ largely obsolete - it having a sucky debugger and virtually stationary development. It had no unique selling point; Code::Blocks on the other hand is cross-platform, and with add-ins supports native-code visual GUI development (i.e. not .NET/Windows Forms which was the only visual GUI development framework supported by early Express editions), which is largely why it has survived the Microsoft entry into free tools.
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    Hi clifford,

    Would that mean Code::Blocks is a better choice than Orwell Dev-C++? Which would you personally recommend?
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    Originally Posted by kathyrollo
    Would that mean Code::Blocks is a better choice than Orwell Dev-C++? Which would you personally recommend?
    Probably Code::Blocks, but I have not used Orwell. I have used Bloodshed Dev-C++, Orwell may have resolved a number of issues with Dev-C++, but it still appears to lack features. (Visual GUI design, cross-platform capability).
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    All right, thanks. I'm currently used to Orwell since our professor asked us to use Bloodshed Dev-C++. After I learned from this forum it has been discontinued since 2005, I immediately switched to the Orwell fork.

    Code::Blocks doesn't seem to have any recent update as well though, the latest being November 2012. Still, I'll be keeping it in close standby; installing now. :)
    Last edited by kathyrollo; May 7th, 2013 at 11:57 AM.
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    Originally Posted by kathyrollo
    All right, thanks. I'm currently used to Orwell since our professor asked us to use Bloodshed Dev-C++. After I learned from this forum it has been discontinued since 2005, I immediately switched to the Orwell fork.

    Code::Blocks doesn't seem to have any recent update as well though, the latest being November 2012. Still, I'll be keeping it in close standby; installing now. :)
    What? That's only 6 months ago. Do you expect releases every day? If so you can download and compile the nightly snapshots.

    Jim
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    If you have the bandwidth, you should try downloading Microsoft Express. Even if you don't use it much, it's always good to have more than one commonly used compiler in your tool-box. Though a tad slower than 2008, the 2010 Express version is reasonably well up to date on the standards front.
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    @jimblumberg:
    No. I was just saying the latest update was last November 2012.

    @jwdonahue:
    I'll try to get my hands on that, thanks.
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