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    Book Reccomendations..


    I'm not exactly sure what I'm looking for. I can basically program as long as it is just python stuff. When you start pulling in the modules and such I get a little lost. So, Maybe I should get two books a beginers book to tidy up the peices I missed and another book for more advanced stuff. I read on the forums about older books, but I'd like something not so out of date.

    Thanks again.
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    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

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    O' Reilly books are the best IMHO. They have a great Python section:
    http://python.oreilly.com/
    For beginners, "Learning Python" and "Programming Python" are very useful. For more advanced stuff, "The Python Cookbook" is an absolute must.
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    Alright, thanks for the recomendation.

    I will be programming mostly in a windows enviroment, although, code that can do cross-plaform would be nice. In your experiences is a book based strickly on windows programming with python a good investment or no ?

    This is kinda off the subject but does anyone know of a website where you trade stuff instead of buying it ?
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    I just finished Learning Python from Oreilly and have begun Programming Python. Everything in Learning Python is pretty much cross platform (just the Python basics). In Programming Python, Mr. Lutz clearly points out what works on Linux and Windows (he uses both for the book). The book is a bit dated so for example, he explains that the os.fork() function does not work for Win32 but I'm not sure if today it does (written for 2.0, not 2.3). Still, the book is great.
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    Originally Posted by ryankask
    The book is a bit dated so for example, he explains that the os.fork() function does not work for Win32 but I'm not sure if today it does (written for 2.0, not 2.3). Still, the book is great.
    os.fork is not implemented in Windows Python, and probably never will be because the operating system does not support it.

    There are very few books out there that cover 2.2 (O'reilly's Python in a Nutshell and the Python Cookbook are the only ones I know of), and none that I know of that cover 2.3. This is not a big problem though since all the 2.0/2.1 code is likely to work on later versions. There have been some additions to the language since then, but it has retained excellent backwards compatibility.

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    Originally Posted by Noah_C
    I will be programming mostly in a windows enviroment, although, code that can do cross-plaform would be nice. In your experiences is a book based strickly on windows programming with python a good investment or no ?
    If you are going to be doing serious Windows programming using the Win32All extensions then it is worth getting the book Python Programming On Win32. This covers all the Windows specific topics such as COM programming, GUI development with the Windows API, etc. However it is not needed for basic Python development.

    Dave - The Developers' Coach
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    Originally Posted by Noah_C
    I'm not exactly sure what I'm looking for. I can basically program as long as it is just python stuff. When you start pulling in the modules and such I get a little lost. So, Maybe I should get two books a beginers book to tidy up the peices I missed and another book for more advanced stuff. I read on the forums about older books, but I'd like something not so out of date.

    Thanks again.
    Once you have picked up the basics of the language, I would recommend Python in a Nutshell as a general reference and The Python Cookbook for advanced techniques, both by O'Reilly. They both cover 2.2 features so are pretty up to date. There were some nifty features added in 2.1 and 2.2 (e.g. list substitutions, generators) which will not be covered by older books.

    Dave - The Developers' Coach
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    Devshed Frequenter (2500 - 2999 posts)

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    The second edition of Learning Python covers Python 2.3 and is very good, infact both books are excelent for beginners!

    After you have the basics down i'd say get yourself a copy of Python in a Nutshell and or Programming Python though i'd also recoment Python, A Complete Referance even though the last two are pretty dated now.

    After this you can narrow down the field to something like Python Programming On Win32. These should keep you busy for a long while .

    Happy reading,

    Mark.
    programming language development: www.netytan.com Hula

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    Originally Posted by DevCoach
    os.fork is not implemented in Windows Python, and probably never will be because the operating system does not support it.

    Dave - The Developers' Coach
    Right, but he did mention that ActiveState was working on porting an os.fork()-like function for Perl and he suggested they may go on to implement it in their version of Python. I do not know the status of that Perl project...


    In addition, Learning Python, 2nd edition, is an excellent book that I recently finished. It covers the latest version of Python (2.3) and I recommend it to all those who wish to begin learning Python. He teaches all the basics (and more) in terms of the syntax and common style. I then suggest you pick up Programming Python because he applies what you are supposed to have learned in Learning Python to many common and 'fun' tasks.
    Last edited by ryankask; June 23rd, 2004 at 10:11 AM. Reason: addition
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    Alright thanks for all the advise.
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    Here is a great free book written for the beginner

    How to Think Like a Computer Scientist:
    Learning with Python

    http://greenteapress.com/thinkpython/

    I you use it and like it you should make a donation to the project

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