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    Is Python any good with math programs?


    Hey Y'all,

    I am the Bill Buckner of computers. I just started at the age of 62. I am a piss ant.

    None the less, here I am.

    So please, treat me with kid gloves! I am totally ignorant and understand that, ignorant is the definition of beginning.

    Does Python do anything as far as a mathmatics programs?

    Have you ever heard of doing a program in mathmatics with polyominoes?

    I am learning as fast as I can, but I just got started, so please bear with me.

    Thank you for your understanding of my ignorance.
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    Devshed Demi-God (4500 - 4999 posts)

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    Sure, python is fine with math. The enthought python distribution includes scipy and has, roughly, matlab equivalence. I searched the internet for
    polyominoes python
    with many hits.

    Hey, why python? Try j.
    Executable Iverson notation

    Either way, we'll give you a first baseman's glove.
    [code]Code tags[/code] are essential for python code and Makefiles!
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    Originally Posted by redmanblackdog
    Does Python do anything as far as a mathmatics programs?
    Absolutely. The mathematics community has been slowly shifting away from the standard proprietary tools (Matlab, Mathematica, etc.) to free-software tools, many of which are built on Python or interface nicely with Python.

    • Numpy/scipy are the primary package for numerical computation. (Numpy is basically the numerical core of scipy.) There's also cvxopt for convex optimization. I've been using the combination of numpy/scipy/matplotlib/cvxopt for computations with real-world data over the past few years.
    • For not-so-numerical computation, you may want to look into Sage, which from what I understand is based on Python and can be used as a Python module. I haven't used it much, but lots of people (including mathematicians) think highly of it.
    • There's always pure Python. It's very easy to implement data structures and algorithms in Python. My main caveat is efficiency: programs written in pure Python will be significantly slower than their counterparts in a compiled language like C, C++, or Fortran.
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    Originally Posted by redmanblackdog
    Hey Y'all,
    Have you ever heard of doing a program in mathmatics with polyominoes?
    Is that like a polynomial dominoe?

    Comments on this post

    • b49P23TIvg agrees : Beautiful!
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