Thread: CORBA in Ruby

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    CORBA in Ruby


    I'm converting a Java/J2EE app over to Ruby/Rails. I need a solution for the CORBA calls. I see that Ruby has its own distributed API (DRb) and there are a few 3rd party CORBA tools, but nothing seems viable for actually doing CORBA in Ruby. What are you guys using professionally?

    Disclaimer: I've already searched Google and tried a number of tools. So please only suggest somethig if you are personally using the tools or 100% sure they work.
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    Is there any specific reason behaind using CORBA as there are lots of great Ruby DSL's available for building API's... PUPPET is a nnice option..
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    CORBA cobwebs


    C'mon now. It's a legacy system. Obviously we wouldn't choose to use CORBA in 2012.

    In any case, we have decided not to use Ruby at all and have moved on.
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    What factors forced you to make this decision of not using RoR...??????
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    Ruby didn't turn out to be the cure-all it was advertised to be. We had a couple fanboys who drank way too much of the kool-aid and convinced upper mgmt that Ruby would do anything in 1/10th the time of any other language, do it better, and everything would work perfectly, and you'll have FUN programming too!

    I must say that I found it interesting and had some fun. Ruby has its place. Unfortunately, we're not creating greenfield web apps. We're creating mission critical, highly available, massively scaled, <insert big buzzwords here>, enterprise development.

    This post is a great example. Any time we needed to do something other than get data from a database and display it on a web page, development stopped. Ruby simply wasn't as capable as we'd hoped. It didn't end up saving time. Not to mention that it's VERY difficult to find developers or support for Ruby. Every new version and the gems would break. It didn't work well with other technologies. The list goes on and on.

    I'm no Ruby expert or anything, but from all my research and experience, it's junk. At least in the space I work, it's just not viable. I realize there are some out there that claim you CAN make it work, and surely you can make anything work, but I don't see the point in trying when there are proven technologies out there that have much more industry support.

    If the task was to build a marketing website from scratch and you already had a few experienced Ruby developers in-house, Ruby would be a fine choice. Perhaps the best.
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    I'l say, its not junk.
    Its just that RoR is not for your task. Every task needs a special & specific platform to work on.
    And may be Ruby on Rails is not the one needed.
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    Agreed. That's why I said at the end that it would be a fine choice for a simple web application.

    I'm a little biased as well because I like strongly typed languages. I know, I know, Ruby is "allegedly" strongly typed. But you know what I mean. It's a scripting language. And I hate waiting until runtime to find out there's a typo somewhere. That said, as syntax validators, pre-compilers, etc. get better, I would think most of that would go away.

    I have to wonder why, after 18 years or whatever, Ruby still hasn't really "made it". It has the feel of a new framework, each minor point release isn't compatible with anything else, configuration (supposedly the easy part) is a nightmare, etc.

    I found Ruby "charming" in many ways. But for professional/real projects, I just can't see taking the risk.

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