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    A simple method to simulate PKE


    Greetings all,

    I've been wrangling with a challenge for a few days, and would really appreciate the community input. I'm an education, and involved in building out Engineering the Net, a collection of resources that help teachers teach young people about how the internet works.

    One of the topics we have wanted to teach is that of public key cryptography. However, even basic examples (for instance, using the sample on Wikipedia) are too complex for say, a middle school audience. Even using simple primes (like 5 and 7) requires sophisticated math.

    I wonder if there are other ways to approach the problem -- what kinds of simulations might be usable in the context of a middle school classroom that engage teaching (and understanding) of public key crypto?

    Thanks for your ideas!
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    Originally Posted by dave-plml
    I wonder if there are other ways to approach the problem -- what kinds of simulations might be usable in the context of a middle school classroom that engage teaching (and understanding) of public key crypto?
    Hello, dave-plml. Definitely have a look under the 'Asymmetric Block Ciphers' section of jCrypTool which includes RSA and several other PKE algorithms: http://www.cryptool.org/en/jcryptool

    jCrypTool is actually intended for students and those learning about encryption, and is platform agnostic since it runs on the JVM.

    An overview: http://www.cryptool.org/en/jcryptool...rning-platform

    Hope this helps!

    - Null
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    RSA using modulus=11; public-exponent=3; private-exponent=7 keeps the math simple enough to do it by hand.
    sub{*{$::{$_}}{CODE}==$_[0]&& print for(%:: )}->(\&Meh);

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