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    Need some help on this


    Hi

    we have a directory like
    \Docklinks\Attachments in unix system

    This path is set from back end Oracle

    Update doctypes set path="\docklinks\attchments"

    if we attach the documents from front end application then the attchments will store in the unix system or not?

    Actuall we have to restrict storing documents in the server

    May i know what is Black slash path in Unix systems
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    I am a little confused over what you need. First thing to point out is that *nix system are case-sensitive, whereas Windows is not.

    *nix systems use the backslash (\) to delimit directories, Windows uses the forward slash (/).

    What you 'attach', whatever process that means will depend upon the configuration of both the application and the platform upon which it runs.
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    > *nix systems use the backslash (\) to delimit directories, Windows uses the forward slash (/).
    Other way round: Windows is \, *nix is /

    Backslash to a Unix system is just another character, though it does need to be quoted occasionally (most shells, C programs, perl, awk etc).
    Code:
    $ mkdir "bs\\path"
    $ ls -l
    total 4
    drwxrwxr-x 2 sc sc 4096 2012-12-04 17:58 bs\path
    $ cd bs\\path/
    $ pwd
    /home/sc/test/bs\path
    Though if you're running Oracle on your windows box, and the file system is on a shared network drive (via NFS or SAMBA), then the network file system should take care of \ to / mappings for you.

    Comments on this post

    • SimonJM agrees : *slaps head* You'd never think I used to be a Unix sysprog, huh? ;)
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
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