Thread: domains

    #1
  1. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    26
    Rep Power
    0

    domains


    Our web site domain has recently changed from mydomain1.com to mydomain2.com. However, there are still urls floating around out there from search engine bots etc. that include mydomain1.com, making a lot of broken links. Any url on the site must use the new mydomain2.com because of a Perl script that basically runs the site.

    My question: Is there a way to configure Apache so that any request for mydomain1.com is automatically changed to mydomain2.com? This would include longer URLS like mydomain1.com/images/myimage.jpg which would be automatically changed to mydomain2.com/images/myimage.jpg

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Jon
  2. #2
  3. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    0

    http://httpd.apache.org/docs-2.0/mod/mod_alias.html#redirect


    This fit the bill? Yanked from apache.org

    Redirect directive
    Syntax: Redirect [status] url-path url
    Context: server config, virtual host, directory, .htaccess
    Override: FileInfo
    Status: Base
    Module: mod_alias

    The Redirect directive maps an old URL into a new one. The new URL is returned to the client which attempts to fetch it again with the new address. Url-path a (%-decoded) path; any requests for documents beginning with this path will be returned a redirect error to a new (%-encoded) url beginning with url.

    Example:

    Redirect /service http://foo2.bar.com/service
    If the client requests http://myserver/service/foo.txt, it will be told to access http://foo2.bar.com/service/foo.txt instead.

    Note: Redirect directives take precedence over Alias and ScriptAlias directives, irrespective of their ordering in the configuration file. Also, Url-path must be an absolute path, not a relative path, even when used with .htaccess files or inside of <Directory> sections.

    If no status argument is given, the redirect will be "temporary" (HTTP status 302). This indicates to the client that the resource has moved temporarily. The status argument can be used to return other HTTP status codes:


    permanent
    Returns a permanent redirect status (301) indicating that the resource has moved permanently.
    temp
    Returns a temporary redirect status (302). This is the default.
    seeother
    Returns a "See Other" status (303) indicating that the resource has been replaced.
    gone
    Returns a "Gone" status (410) indicating that the resource has been permanently removed. When this status is used the url argument should be omitted.
    Other status codes can be returned by giving the numeric status code as the value of status. If the status is between 300 and 399, the url argument must be present, otherwise it must be omitted. Note that the status must be known to the Apache code (see the function send_error_response in http_protocol.c).
  4. #3
  5. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    26
    Rep Power
    0

    Thank You!


    Thanks!

    That's exactly what I was looking for!

    Jon
  6. #4
  7. No Profile Picture
    Junior Member
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    0
    Glad I could help ^_^

    Rob-

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo