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    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

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    Upgrading disks on windows server 2003


    Have a w2k3 server with system and data partitions on a raided disk. Because of data creep, the physical size of the drive is no longer viable. I'm looking to replace the physical volumes with 1tb drives, anything to look out for... strategy, etc, etc

    UPDATE - STRATEGY

    1 - Shut Down Machines and extract disks
    2 - Insert 2 x 1TB drives and mark as a Mirrored RAID (RAID I).
    3 - Create 2 partitions on the RAIDED drive.
    4 - Shut machine down and extract 1 TB drives
    5 - On another machine, mount one of the original disks over USB and create an image of the system partition, and an image of the data partition.
    6 - Expand these images to each of the RAID set
    7 - Mount the drives in the server and spin up the box

    Looking for advice on which disk imaging software to use, and also advice on whether said plan is viable

    Many thanks
    Last edited by Axweildr; February 10th, 2011 at 06:36 PM. Reason: More Info - and not from the 'droid
    --Ax
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    I don't have a ton of experience doing this, but my initial advice would be to stick with an Acronis product and please save system images of the data to an external drive before you do anything. Always leave yourself an out. I think what you're proposing could work, but like I said, save images to a drive you don't plan on messing with.

    With that said, acronis has some pretty nice server image software that is supposed to allow you to do restores onto different hardware. I think if you save an image of the two partitions to an external disk, put the new drives in (create the arrays you want), and boot to the Acronis recovery media, you should be able to restore the images.
    Last edited by seack79; February 10th, 2011 at 07:08 PM.
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    Grumpier old Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

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    I agree with seack79. And if you don't have a windows imaging program handy, if you're in to linux at all you can use dd to save an image of the existing disks to a file.
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    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

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    Hi Doug,

    Any particular linux distro you'd recommend? I have a Debian box, but I haven't spun it up in about 4 months. I'm assuming dd will take a full clone of the partition, SIDS and all? I'll research dd today

    Am I right in thinking as long as I don't modify the original disks from the original RAID, I'll be able to spin up the original RAID and revert back to the status quo as a contingency

    Many thanks and Best Regards
    --Ax
    without exception, there is no rule ...
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    The great thing about Object Oriented code is that it can make small, simple problems look like large, complex ones


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    Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems.
    -- Jamie Zawinski
    Detavil - the devil is in the detail, allegedly, and I use the term advisedly, allegedly ... oh, no, wait I did ...
    BIT COINS ANYONE
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    Grumpier old Moderator
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    I'm a Fedora type, so I use a Fedora 14 live cd. I haven't done images of a raid disk but I often make dd images of either an entire disk or a partition. If you image a partition, you can mount the .iso file itself. And dd is also included on a live gparted CD if you don't need any other OS stuff.

    I just imaged my Aunt's laptop disk (windows xp) with a gparted cd. She had a 30gb disk getting full and I put in an 80gb disk.
    - Hook up a usb external disk with enough room to hold the disk image
    - boot the gparted cd. Fumble into a terminal window and su - as root
    - Do fdisk -l to verify disk devices
    - Mount the external drive somewhere
    - dd if=/dev/sda of=/mnt/tmp/olddisk.iso
    - Go out to lunch (it's a 2000 vintage laptop )
    - After lunch, pull out the old laptop disk, put in a larger disk
    - reboot gparted back into terminal.
    - dd if=/mnt/tmp/olddisk.iso of=/dev/sda

    And that exactly cloned the old disk as a partition of the same size as the old disk and a bunch of unallocated space on the new disk. When you dd the entire disk it clones partition table, mbr and all.

    Last was to use gparted to extend the partition to the full size of the new disk.

    This all got done without incident.

    If there are any issues with this kind of procedure on a RAID disk, if nothing else you might want to image the partitions and make sure you have a good copy of the existing data before performing drive surgery.

    [edit]I should add a word of caution, make sure you have inputs and outputs right. dd is one of the old-timey linux programs with a shortage of 'fail-safe' questions. If you got your if's and of's reversed you'd probably wipe out the wrong disk.

    One more edit, I have used this procedure to clone a w2003 server to a new disk in the past and had no problems with SID's or anything. I haven't restored a cloned partition only file but I believe the process is to partition the target disk first then restore to /dev/sda2 or whatever.
    Last edited by Doug G; February 11th, 2011 at 01:52 PM.
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    ======
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    I'd buy the Acronis True Image for servers. It's not that expensive, and works fine on raids, allows you to image while its running, then just put in new disks and restore .

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