Page 1 of 4 123 ... Last
  • Jump to page:
    #1
  1. Retired Moderator
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    6,669
    Rep Power
    147

    Post Useful Windows Information


    Some of the regular posters to this forum have decided to provide useful Windows information, in the hope that it may answer some of the more common questions so that people can find their answers without having to create new threads.

    This thread is strictly for posting useful information to other people. While it will remain open for the time being, I'd like it if people could limit the comments they make. If you'd like to thank someone for the information they've provided, use the built-in reputation system (click the scales in the top-right hand corner of the post) as this will keep the thread clear for everyone to read, and it'll also benefit the person who posted the information.

    If you're not sure whether or not you've got valuable information to post in this thread, PM me first before you post and I'll check it over for you. I'll be checking every post in this forum, so any rubbish will just be deleted.

    Contents of this thread

    • While surfing the Internet... (Dngrsone) (link)
      Practicing safe surfing habits will significantly reduce your chances of being infected with malware.

    • Further tips relating to web surfing (nilpo) (link)

    • Backing Up and Restoring the Registry (aitken325i) (link)

    • When control panel will not start (0000) (link)

    • Using a Windows 98 boot disk to format and install a fresh copy of Windows XP (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Doing a completely fresh install of XP using the XP install disk (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Re-install Windows XP without having to re-activate (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Speeding up Windows XP Pro Boot up by a small bit (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Some useful commands available in Windows XP (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Modify permissions for registry keys in Windows XP (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Keeping a tab on changes to the registry (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Lock your desktop in windows XP (oneMSBi) (link)

    • How to do a complete repair installation with Windows XP (without recovery console) (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Managing Windows Services (eia_hunter) (link)

    • Task manager "mini" mode (0000) (link)

    • Hardware abstraction layer correction (0000) (link)

    • Windows Won't Boot. Now What? (eia_hunter) (link)

    • Using System Restore, when even safe mode boot fails, in Win XP (oneMSBi) (link)

    • Reducing PC Slow Down after running a lot of programs (oneMSBi) (link)

    • How to edit or fiddle with "boot.ini" quite safely for fun! (megumi amatuka) (link)

    • How to have a logon like a network user on a home pc (Windows Xp) (aitken325i) (link)

    • Locking XP, CMD History, XP install to multiple machines, Make windows login to a domain as a domain user automagicly at bootup, Prevent user bypass of an auto login name, Adding registry values to computers in login scipts. (juniperr) (link)

    • CD-ROM Access is missing. Error Code 31, Code 32, Code 19, Code 39, or Code 41 (0000) (link)

    • How to reinstall IE and its Initialization (megumi matuka) (link)

    • How to change the background if you are not given a direct access to the registry editor nor the "desktop>right click>etc..." (Dictionary) (link)

    • Ten Commandments for Your Computer Sanity (nilpo) (link)

    • Disable AU Restart Reminder (nilpo) (link)

    • Virus Removal Tips (mod note: Excellent ) (nilpo) (link)

    • Avoiding Repair Installs When Changing Motherboards A Discussion with good information (by Nilpo, Juniperr, Megumi Amatuka) (link)

    • Getting access to external drives when auto-detect is disabled (Dictionary) (link)

    • Some Windows Key Shortcut Keys (aitken325i) (link)

    • Alternative way to open Display Properties directly (nilpo) (link)

    • Unhide hidden applications from Add/Remove Programs applet in Control Panel (nilpo) (link)

    • Remote Connection to remote computer - How to copy a file over from your local machine (juniperr) (link)

    • Disable Unnecessary Windows services (t3j45) (link)

    • Various Windows tips (KyrinComaBlack) (link)

    • How to Resolve the "Unknown Device" (eia_hunter) (link)

    • Diagnosing missing security updates/Group Policy (guest2006) (link)

    • Remotely accessing a computer through Safe Mode with Networking (hiker) (link)

    Comments on this post

    • boydg agrees
    • salem agrees : Excellent collection of info
    • Arty Ziff agrees
    Last edited by aitken325i; September 28th, 2007 at 06:18 AM.
  2. #2
  3. Infernal Technomancer
    Devshed Novice (500 - 999 posts)

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Centrally located far from everywhere
    Posts
    950
    Rep Power
    98

    While surfing the Internet...


    Practicing safe surfing habits will significantly reduce your chances of being infected with malware.
    • Read EULAs before clicking on them when installing software.
    • Read and understand what you are clicking when a window pops up while you are surfing-- If it is a window telling you your machine might be infected, don't click on it unless you know it's a message from the installed AV software or you will be guaranteed infection.
    • Don't surf for pr0n, warez, crackz, etc.
    • Exercise extreme caution when using peer-to-peer applications (yes, there are legal uses for such).
    • Disconnect your internet connection when not surfing. This is a no-brainer for us 56k bubbas, but cable subscribers don't bother and that leaves the bad guys plenty of opportunity to turn those always online machines into DDOS zombies.
    • Find an alternative browser to Internet Explorer as it is the favorite target of malcontents.
    • If possible, use a firewall, particularly for those "always on" connections.

    Comments on this post

    • edwinbrains agrees
    • 0000 agrees
    • Axweildr agrees : Thanks for taking the time
    • aitken325i agrees
    • oneMSBi agrees : great stuff ...
  4. #3
  5. Devshed Beginner (1000 - 1499 posts)

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    New Springfield, OH
    Posts
    1,236
    Rep Power
    1469
    In addition to Dngr's tip here are a couple of other tips relating to web surfing.

    • Always install hotfixes and security updates for you browser. The designer's release these as security issues are discovered.
    • Consider using a HOSTS file. Proper use of a Hosts file can greatly reduce risk of infection by blocking unwanted sites. See link below for more information.
    • Don't follow a link unless you know it's destination. If you are unsure, it's probably not that important.
    • Disable ActiveX controls. ActiveX control allow webpages to gain control of certain functions on your computer. Unless you are on a trusted site, you probably don't need them to run.
    • Consider changing browsers. Browser such as Firefox and Opera have far less security risks than Internet Explorer.
    • If you are going to use Internet Explorer, consider using Restricted Zones to block unwanted sites.


    Click Here for more information on Hosts files

    Comments on this post

    • Dngrsone agrees : Still feeding my bookmarks, aren't you?
    • edwinbrains agrees
    • 0000 agrees
    • Axweildr agrees : Thanks for taking the time
    • aitken325i agrees
    • oneMSBi agrees : good stuff +23
    Don't like me? Click it.

    Scripting problems? Windows questions? Ask the Windows Guru!

    Stay up to date with all of my latest content. Follow me on Twitter!

    Help us help you! Post your exact error message with these easy tips!
  6. #4
  7. Providing fuel for space ships
    Devshed Supreme Being (6500+ posts)

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    nr Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    14,382
    Rep Power
    3848

    Backing Up and Restoring the Registry


    Windows stores information about how it is configured in a centralised database called the Registry. The Registry not only contains information about how Windows is set up on your PC, but also how each application you have installed is configured.

    Storing all this information centrally makes it easy to adjust settings and keep track of configuration information, but it makes for one giant vulnerability in the operating system. If your Registry gets damaged your system may be rendered unusable. Even minor Registry errors can cause programs to crash or behave erratically.

    That’s why whenever you use the Registry Editor (regedit) to change settings within the Registry, you’re admonished to make a backup first. No doubt you’ve seen this warning frequently.

    That’s all very well, but what do you do if something does go wrong with your Registry? How do you restore that backup?

    Windows gives you a variety of ways to recover from a damaged Registry. We’ll look at the simplest way to get you back up and running after a disaster. But before that, let’s look at the easiest way to ensure you have a current backup of your Registry.
    Automatic backups

    The good news is Windows 98 and Me automate the process of creating a Registry backup (Windows XP does, too, although the Registry is organised differently under Windows XP and Windows 2000). Once each day, the Windows-based Registry Checker tool (scanregw.exe) backs up the Registry – which consists of the two files user.dat and system.dat and, in some cases, a third file, policy.pol as well – to the hidden \Windows\Sysbckup folder. (Note: To make this hidden folder visible, open Windows Explorer and select Folder Options from the Tools or View Menu. Click the View tab and, under Hidden Files, select Show All Files and remove the tick beside Hide File Extensions For Known File Types.)

    The backed up Registry files are placed in a Cabinet (CAB) file called RB0nn.cab, where nn is a number from 01 to 99, together with backups of two other important system files, system.ini and win.ini. By default, the Registry Checker makes a maximum of five Registry backups, named RB001.cab - RB005.cab. When five backups already exist, the Registry Checker creates the next backup by overwriting the oldest CAB file. You can thus determine the most recent Registry backup by comparing the file dates of each of the CAB files.
    Manual backups

    You can use the Registry Checker to create a backup of the Registry at any time. This is a good idea if you’re about to edit the Registry and want to ensure you can get yourself back up and running if anything goes wrong. Before you use the Registry Editor, run the Registry Checker manually:

    1. Click Start -> Run, type scanregw in the Open box and click OK.
    2. The Registry Checker will check the Registry for errors and, if none are found, will tell you that a backup of the Registry has already been made today. It will offer to make an additional backup. Click Yes to create this new backup then click OK once the backup has been created.

    Restoring the Registry

    If something goes wrong and you need to replace the current version of the Registry with one of your backups, here’s how:

    1. Start your computer in MS-DOS mode. If you’re using Windows 98, do this by restarting the computer and holding down the Ctrl key (on some computers, you use the F8 key) until the boot menu appears. From the boot menu select Command Prompt Only. If you’re using Windows Me, you’ll need to use your Windows Me Startup floppy disk (you do have one, don’t you?). Restart your computer with the floppy disk in the drive and choose Minimal Boot. If you don’t have a Windows Me Startup disk, make one now before disaster strikes, by clicking Start -> Settings -> Control Panel -> Add/Remove Programs -> Startup Disk and following the prompts.

    2. At the DOS prompt, type:

    scanreg /restore

    This runs the DOS-based version of the Registry Checker tool.

    3. Select a backup from the list provided – usually the most recent backup is the best option – and press Enter.
    4. Press Enter to restart your computer (remove the boot disk from the floppy drive first if you’ve used one).

    For Windows XP systems, I would recommend creating a restore point before you do any changes to the registry. This is the easiest method of returning your registry to it's previous state. To do this:

    1. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Restore.
    2. In the System Restore dialog box, click Create a restore point, and then click Next.
    3. Type a description for your restore point, such as "Before Registry Change", then click Create.
    4. If your system fails, press F8 in the boot menu, and then click Last known good configuration. Windows XP restores your system to the most recent restore point.

    Hope this is of help to anyone.

    Comments on this post

    • B-Con agrees
    • edwinbrains agrees
    • eia_hunter agrees
    • Axweildr agrees : Thanx 4 taking the time
    • oneMSBi agrees : fantastic.. meant to rep you earlier but it slipped my mind
    The No Ma'am commandments:

    1.) It is O.K. to call hooters 'knockers' and sometimes snack trays
    2.) It is wrong to be French
    3.) It is O.K. to put all bad people in a giant meat grinder
    4.) Lawyers, see rule 3
    5.) It is O.K. to drive a gas guzzler if it helps you get babes
    6.) Everyone should car pool but me
    7.) Bring back the word 'stewardesses'
    8.) Synchronized swimming is not a sport
    9.) Mud wrestling is a sport
  8. #5
  9. Contributing User
    Devshed Newbie (0 - 499 posts)

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    209
    Rep Power
    23

    When control panel will not start.


    When the control panel will not start, go into search, and move the directory to system32. Search ".cpl" excluding the quotation marks. Make a folder on the desktop called "temp", again, excluding quotations. Move the .cpl files to the temp folder, you may notice them returning in the search window, this is a good thing. Open control panel, and it should work, then delete the temp folder.

    Comments on this post

    • edwinbrains agrees
    • Axweildr agrees : Thanks for taking the time
    • aitken325i agrees
    Last edited by oneMSBi; November 30th, 2005 at 12:56 AM.
  10. #6
  11. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Using a Win 98 Boot disk to format and install a fresh copy of Windows Xp


    ok folks, so your nice happy windows xp pc, is all messed up with malware, or some other problem and you need to format and re-install the operating system. If this is true read on.

    What you will need:
    1) your windows Xp installation disk (this one's the mama disk )
    2) an empty floppy (or a floppy with no valuable data on it)
    3) win 9x boot disk image.

    for #3 i prefer to use a windows 98 SE boot disk with has Smartdrv.exe (a disk cache program) on it. There is a nifty little program that will create this for you located here

    Before you proceed if you have any data you want to back up please copy it onto a different harddisk partition. ie. the partition on which we will NOT be formating and installing windowsXP again. Please not that some applications may need to be re-installed, as just copying the folders will not be sufficient. I specify this primarily for your "my documents" folder.

    How to create the bootdisk:
    =====================
    step1: download the file from the link i provided for #3
    step2: put a 3 1/2 inch floppy into the floppy drive which contains no data, or data which you dont mind losing.
    step3: double click the file you have just downloaded.

    **Caution: running this program will make you loose any data on the floppy disk you have inserted******

    step3: once this disk is ready, leave it in the floppy drive, and pop your windows xp cd into the cd tray, close any windows at open up autoimatically on detecting the cd.

    I Made the bootdisk. now how to go about formating my drive
    ==========================================
    great going so far.

    step5 : restart your computer. You now need to enter your BIOS and set it so that the computer will boot first from floppy and then from cd, and last from harddisk. To do this, as soon as your comp is has shutdown, and is in the proceses of restarting, you have to press and hold the DEL key (maybe the F10 or F12 key for some computer systems). This will take you to your BIOS screen. Most BIOS systems will have a simple way for you to set you primary, seconday and third boot devices. Make the first boot device floppy, second cd-rom and third your hardisk.

    step6 : save and exit the bios. the computer will now restart and give you the option to boot from floppy. if it does not automatically boot from floppy, and asks you to choose, please select "yes, boot from floppy".

    step 7: there will be a short wait while your computer loads windows 98 from the floppy disk. it will finally land you at the a:>\ prompt.

    step 8: Now type the command "format c:" without the quotes.
    (i assume your windows system is installed to c: and this is the drive we want to format and re-install the OS onto)

    step 9: once the format is complete, please type this command
    "smartdrv". there will be no acknowledgement for this command from the system, it just return you to the A:>\ prompt.

    ok my c: drive is formatted now how do i install xp
    ======================================
    excellent. we are almost done.

    step 10: Now we have switch to your cd rom, which contains your xp cd. most probably this will be a drive like D: or E: or maybe even F: so please type "d:", or "e:", and follow each of them up with this command "dir/p". The "dir/p" command will give you a directory listing of the drive you are on currently. The cd rom drive will have a listing of a folders by the name of I386. This is the folder we want to get though. so when on this drive type the following command "cd I386".

    step 11: the prompt should change to something like this "D:>\i386" or "E:>\I386\". now type the command "winnt".

    step12 :now grab some coffee, and sit back and let the windows install take over.

    Note: after you get your xp installed you can revert your BIOS boot device priority to Harddisk first.

    Comments on this post

    • edwinbrains agrees
    • aitken325i agrees
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 06:52 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  12. #7
  13. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Doing a completely fresh install of Xp using the Xp install disk


    If you dont want to go through the hassle of using a boot disk, then you can format using your xp disk directly. please note that for this, your BIOS should support booting from cd.
    Make sure you Bios is set to boot from CD (see step 5 of the above post) and there is no floppy in the floppy drive.

    ************NOTE:: VERY IMPORTANT **********
    by this method you will LOOSE ALL DATA on ALL your hardisk partitions. there will be no going back once your partitions have been wiped. This is an abosolute, clean slate to begin with.
    *********************************************

    Boot the computer with the XP CD in the drive and allow setup to begin. When you come to the screen where you select the drive partition you should see the drive listed with all the space listed as unpartitioned. If the drive was in use previously, you'll need to delete all the existing partitions. To do this you'll have to hit the 'D' key followed by the 'L' key. The screen instructions will be visible to guide the process.

    Once all the existing partitions are deleted the display will show the total unpartitioned disk space.

    Hit the 'C' key to create a partition. If you only want one partition then hit enter and the entire disk space will be allocated to the C Drive, but it will be NTFS, assuming the drive is 32GB or larger. However, if you want to create several FAT32 partitions then do not hit the Enter key. Instead, hit 'Backspace' until the cursor moves to the first digit. Enter the size of the first partition to be created.

    Repeat the create partition process as many times as you want till all available space is allocated to partitions.

    Once all the partitions have been created, use the 'Up' arrow key to select the C drive partition to install XP on and select to format it with FAT32 if you are sure that NTFS isn't a viable file system in your situation.

    After XP has been installed and is running, navigate to Disk Management and format the other partitions with either FAT32 or NTFS. This step is necessary before the partitions will be available for use.
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 02:25 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  14. #8
  15. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Cool Re-Install Windows Xp without having to re-activate


    Each time you install your legal copy of Windows Xp on the same machine, you have to keep re-activating the operating system. This can be quite pesky.

    There is a simple work-around to this.

    After installing windows Xp professional on a machine, the registration settings are stored in a file called "wpa.dbl" located in the %systemroot%\windows\system32 directory where %systemroot% is a variable that will denote the drive on to which you have installed windows (typically C: ).

    Copy this file and save it either to a floppy or cd or usb pen drive, or even a different partition.

    If you ever need to re-install windows simply copy this backed up file over the new file of your new installation, which you will find in the same directory as mentioned above. Thats it. You will not be asked to register your new copy of windows again.

    However keep in mind that this will only work for your own installation of Windows Xp on your machine. This method will not work if you try to copy the file to an installation of windows on another computer. Sorry no piracy allowed

    For advanced users who want a deeper understanding how the registration process of microsfot works, and why this above method is possible, please see the document i had posted once before and linked to below.

    Windows Cd Key & Registration
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 08:20 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  16. #9
  17. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Cool Speeding up Windows Xp Pro Boot up by a small bit


    One of the features of Windows Xp is its ability to defragment the bootup files on startup. this causes the files that are required during boot to be placed close toward the start of this partition/disk resulting in a small increase in speed. Normally this feature is by default enabled.. but for some reason on some pc's i have seen it is disabled.

    You can do this by:

    1) Start the registry editor by clicking on Start > Run > and typing "regedit".

    2) Navigate to the following key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Dfrg\BootOptimiseFunction


    3) From the list in the right windows pane select "Enable". Now right click this entry and choose modify. Change this value to "Y".

    The next time you restart your pc you should see an improvement in you boot up speed.
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 04:09 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  18. #10
  19. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Arrow Some Useful Commands available in Windows Xp


    The following commands need to be run at the "cmd" prompt of Windows Xp. To get to the "cmd" prompt click Start > Run and type in "cmd" and hit enter.

    (note: the cmd prompt is very different from the command prompt for Windows NT based operating systesm (windows NT, XP, 2000, 2003)



    Netstat
    The netstat command can be used to display detailed networking and port information. One of its most important functions is the ability to show what ports are communicating data, and which are open and listening for data at any given time.

    Typing netstat at the cmd prompt will display currently active network connections between your system and any other systems on your network or the internet.

    Typing netstat /a will show you all current connections along with all open and listening ports

    Typing netstat /o will show the process id which belongs to each connection. This is handy for tracking and identfying unwanted spyware/software on your system.

    There are several other options available for this command which can viewed by typing netstat /? at the cmd prompt or doing a search for netstat in the Windows Help & Support

    Tasklist
    This command shows you the processes running on your system along with their Process ID. This program can be configured to show a lot more information that the standard Task Manager in Windows Xp. Helpful when you want to match a Process ID obtained from say netstat /o with the name of the Program/Application running.

    This command has some very useful options that can be run with it. A good way to learn more about the options that can be used, would be the Windows Help and Support. Just do a search for tasklist.

    A common option i use often is tasklist /svc which shows service information

    Another really useful option that i use is tasklist /fi <filtername> where the <filtername> should be replaced with a keyword representing one or more of the allowed filters. this allows you to customise the output of the tasklist command to show only the information that is relevant to you.

    Tasklist also allows you to view the processes running on a remote computer, provided you have the proper access permissions of course, through the use of the /s /u /p options.
    Useful for system administrators.


    PathPing

    This is probably my favorite command of this set. It essentially combines the Ping and Tracert commands into a single and potent network-tracing tool. In its default usage pathping will first list the number of hops (steps through different routers or network servers) required to reach your destination IP address or URL, then it will ping each step along the way 100 times, giving you a clear idea of the speed of your connection between your system and your target, as well as any week links in your network.
    Excellent tool for analysing the degree of packet loss at any given router or link, can help you determine which routers or subnets might be having network problems.

    To use just type pathping followed by the URL or IP address.

    There are several options you can sue with this command and as with the other commands listed here, you can find out more about these at the Windows Help & Support center on your Windows Xp pc. Just do a search for pathping
    (note: options given with this command are case sensitive)
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  20. #11
  21. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Modify permissions for registry keys in Windows Xp


    Sometimes registry permissions prevent you from editing certain entries in the registry and these permissions need to be changed. A common example of this is some of the entries left or modified by virii or malware. Or if you are an administrator of a system, you may want to grant explicit permissions to a particluar user on the system.

    To modify the permissions of registry keys:

    1) Log into the system with an account that had administrator permissions.

    2) Click on start > run> and type regedt32 and click OK

    3) In the Registry Editor, navigate to the registry branch that contains the keys you want to modify/remove.

    4) Right-click the registry branch and from the context menu that drops open select 'Permissions'

    5) In the 'Security' dialog box that follows select the user(s) you want to assign rights to.

    6) Next, activate appropriate permissions in the lower 'Permissions' pane.

    7) You can fine tune the permissions by clicking the 'Advanced' button and making the required changes.

    8) To finish click Apply and then OK
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  22. #12
  23. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Keeping a tab on changes to the registry.


    Ok almost every program installation changes entiries in the registry or modify's them. I make use of a very handy and freely available tool called RegShot (also open source ) to keep tabs on what changes any program i install or remove makes.

    The following post is on using this tool to make before-afterwards reports of the registry so that you know whats going on.

    You can find out about regshot here
    http://the7thlab.mybesthost.com/

    You can download the latest RegShot (as of July 3rd 2005) by clicking below.
    Version 1.7.2 with src + binarys

    The file is about 60kb in size.

    Open the zipped file which again will contain two more zip files (Prgram Data and Source Code). It is sufficient to extract the archive REGSHOT1_7_2.ZIP into a new file. Now you can start the program by clicking REGSHOT.EXE

    What this utility does is, it stores a snapshot of your registry and compares it with another snapshot taken after you install a new program or carry out any system change. You can even set it to save the report as a HTML file.

    You can also specify the folders and subfolders to be scanned.

    Click on 1st shot button, and you get several options:
    • If you select 'Shot' it will take a snapshot which will NOT be saved if you quit the program
    • Selecting 'Shot and Save' will save the snapshot to a hive file. Do keep in mind that hive files tend to be heavy so you better have sufficient harddisk space. Once you have done this you can go ahead with what ever install you had planned or system change etc..
    • The third option on this menu 'Load' will load a saved hive file. you can specify folders and subfolders in the box 'Scan Dir [dir...]'


    To compare the registry changes after you have installed a new program/ modified the system, launch RegShot and click on the 2nd Shot button. Click again on Shot and Save

    Now to compare the two shots, click on the 'Compare' button. you can specify the output path for this comparison report and also add a comment about the file (which will in fact be its fielname).

    NOTE: wherever i use the snapshot i do not mean a graphical snapshot (picture) but rather a text based report/copy of the registry.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  24. #13
  25. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Smile


    Originally Posted by 0000
    When the control panel will not start, go into search, and move the directory to system32. Search ".cpl" excluding the quotation marks. Make a file on the desktop called "temp", again, excluding quotations. Move the .cpl files to the temp folder, you may notice them returning in the search window, this is a good thing. Open control panel, and it should work, then delete the temp folder.
    Just to add on a bit to this. You can also try running the following script. To run the script, copy paste the following code into notepad, and select save as from the file menu. Now save the file with what ever file name you want but remember to give it a .reg extension and in the 'Save as Type' drop down field select 'All files'
    Now you can just double click the file to run it.

    Code:
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    
    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer]
    "NoControlPanel"=dword:00000000
    
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer]
    "NoControlPanel"=dword:00000000

    EDIT: for system administrator who want to disable access to the control panel, the dword in the above code should be set to 00000001 instead and then the script should be run.
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 08:23 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  26. #14
  27. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    Lock your desktop in windows Xp


    Locking your desktop is always a good practise especially if sometimes you have to leave your computer unattended for a while, and the computer is easily accessable to other people.

    The following post will show you way to create an icon on your desktop that you can click to lock your destop down when you need to take that short walk

    1) Right click on the desktop and select new > shorcut from the menu. this will open the 'Create Shortcut Wizard'

    2) Here in the first text box type the following
    "%windir%\System32\rundll32.exe user32.dll,LockWorkStation"
    and give your shortcut a name of your choice. then click 'Finish'

    3) Actually your good to go at this point, but many users tell me they dont like the way the icon looks at this stage. So if you want to customise the icon of this shortcut then:

    Right-click the shortcut and select 'Properties'. Now in the 'Shortcut' tab click the 'Change Icon' button and in the 'Look for icons in this file' box type the following "%SystemRoot%\system32\SHELL32.dll" and now click OK. Now go ahead and select an icon of your choice
    Last edited by oneMSBi; July 3rd, 2005 at 08:25 AM.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
  28. #15
  29. CAUTION: Loderator Moose
    Devshed Loyal (3000 - 3499 posts)

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    some starry place (india)
    Posts
    3,431
    Rep Power
    162

    How to do a complete repair Installation with Windows Xp (Without Recovery Console)


    There are two kinds of repair installations you can do with Windows Xp.

    One method involves the use of the recovery console and the replacement of certain hives from backups. This method is NOT what i'm going to cover in this post.

    Rather I'm going just step through the simple procedure of a complete repair install using the Windows Xp Cd.

    (***Warning: This method will cause any updates and patches applied to your current windows install to be reversed and will take you back to the way Xp was when you first installed. All data from the Documents & Settings folders should be backed up first or copied to a different harddisk partition.***)

    Step 1
    You need to configure you BIOS to boot from CD before Hardisk first so:

    You need to enter your BIOS and set it so that the computer will boot first from from your CD ROM, and last from harddisk. To do this, when your comp has shutdown, and is in the proceses of restarting, you have to press and hold the DEL key (maybe the F10 or F12 key for some computer systems). This will take you to your BIOS screen. Most BIOS systems will have a simple way for you to set you primary, seconday and third boot devices. Make the first boot device CD ROM, second Hardisk and third your floppy drive.

    Step 2
    Insert your Windows Xp cd into the CD ROM drive and restart your computer.

    Step 3
    When the Press any key to boot from Cd message is displayed on your screen, press a key to start your computer from he Windows Xp CD

    Step 4
    The install process should now take over. When you see the following message displayed on the Welcome to Setup screen:
    Press [ENTER]: To setup WINDOWS XP now
    press the Enter key.

    Step 5
    At this point an option to press R to enter the Recovery Console is displayed. DO NOT SELECT THIS OPTION Continue with the installation and on the Windows Licensing Agreement screen press F8 to agree to the License Agreement.

    Step 6
    In the screen that follows make sure your current installation of Windows Xp is selected in the box and then press the R key to repair the Windows Xp installation.

    Step 7
    Just sit back now and follow the instructions on the screen to complete the setup.
    Nigel
    ..Seeking code free nirvana...
    Nigel Fernandes Blog
    Never argue with fools. They will bring you down to their level and beat you with experience.


    Manchester United Forever
Page 1 of 4 123 ... Last
  • Jump to page:

IMN logo majestic logo threadwatch logo seochat tools logo